Water Crisis


Ensuring Clean Drinking Water
– A Global Challenge

It’s a growing global crisis, and it’s getting worse every day: more than one billion people on our planet lack access to fresh drinking water. Almost half of them are children — and 125 million of them are under the age of 5. If present global water consumption patterns continue, two out of every three people on Earth will suffer from water-stressed conditions by the year 2025.

Ongoing pollution, industrialization, deforestation, wasteful agricultural practices, global climate change and other environmental pressures are shrinking the planet’s clean water supply. Around the world, more people and communities are searching for clean, safe drinking water than ever before. And many of them are searching in vain.

Each year 3.5 million people die from water-related diseases. Each and every day, more than 4,000 children die of water-borne illnesses, which are now the second leading cause of death for children under the age of 5. Compounding these staggering numbers are the unpredictable effects of increasingly frequent natural and man-made environmental disasters. These devastating events render safe water undrinkable in a matter of hours or even minutes.


 
Addressing the Problem
– Reversing the Cycle

Bringing safe, clean drinking water close to people’s homes and to victims of disaster — in short, to anywhere it is needed around the world — is the key to reversing the endless cycle of misery that affects so many people. Making clean water accessible is the key to transforming communities and preventing large-scale catastrophes.

The mobile purification units World Solutions provides to those in need have been designed for both immediate use and ongoing service. Simple to operate and very reliable, they require little maintenance. Yet they can provide a continuous supply of safe drinking water within minutes of arrival. Their versatile, self-sustaining design functions reliably and repeatedly in the most difficult water conditions in both remote and urban locations. These innovative and highly effective mobile purification systems can be moved among multiple sites to provide drinking water to several areas.

World Water Headlines

Beijing’s Water Demand Outpaces Supply Despite Conservation, Recycling, and Imports

Beijing’s Water Demand Outpaces Supply Despite Conservation, Recycling, and Imports

“Beijing is at the bull’s-eye of a potentially ruinous collision between accelerating growth and scarce freshwater reserves…”

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Radiation Reaches Tokyo’s Tap Water

Radiation Reaches Tokyo’s Tap Water

“As the death toll in the aftermath of Japan’s devastating tsunami reaches highs of more than 18,000, further fears are growing for survivors as radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants are thought to have contaminated food rations and tap water, sparking cancer fears among an already anxious community.”

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Donation to provide clean, safe water in Haiti

A special presentation and donation was given during the Rotary District 6960 meeting Friday morning that will benefit children in Haiti by preventing the spread of cholera.

Water One, a family owned and operated business, designed and manufactured a solar powered, mobile water purification wagon that will instantly purify water by eliminating 99.99 percent of bacteria and viruses.

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Global Handwashing Day—October 15th

Global Handwashing Day—October 15th

“Handwashing with soap is the most effective and inexpensive way to prevent diarrheal and acute respiratory infections, which take the lives of millions of children in developing countries every year.”

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A 1-Mile Trip To Collect Drinking Water?
Yes, This is America

A 1-Mile Trip To Collect Drinking Water? Yes, This is America

“The stereotypical image of a woman balancing a water jug on her head is not unique to the developing world. There are people living in the U.S. who must do the same thing every day.”

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Global Water Crisis Facts

The Big Picture

  • Unsafe water and lack of basic sanitation cause 80% of diseases and kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war.i
  • A third of the world’s population is enduring some form of water scarcity.ii
  • Only 0.007 percent of the planet's water is available to fuel and feed its 6.8 billion people.iii
  • Half of the world's hospital beds are filled with people suffering from water related illnesses.iv
  • In the past 10 years, diarrhea has killed more children than all the people lost to armed conflict since World War II.v
  • The water and sanitation crisis claims more lives through disease than any war claims through guns.vi
  • An American taking a five-minute shower uses more water than a typical person in a developing country slum uses in a whole day. vii
  • Most of the world’s population spends up to 3 hours a day to get the water they need to survive.viii
  • It is estimated that 5.3 billion people, two-thirds of the world’s population, will suffer from water shortages by 2025.ix
  • Water use has grown at more than twice the rate of population increase in the last century.x
  • 27 percent of people living in cities do not have water piped into their homes, meaning they are often finding water through illegal, unregulated, and polluted sources.xi
  • UN Declares 2005-2015 "Water for Life" as the International Decade for Action and set's the world agenda on a greater focus on water-related issues.xii

Health

  • 80 percent of diseases in the developing world are caused by contaminated water.xiii
  • If we did nothing other than provide access to clean water, without any other medical intervention, we could save 2 million lives a year.xiv
  • Without action to improve clean water and sanitation supplies, as many as 135 million preventable deaths will occur by 2020.xv
  • A person must consume 2 litres of water daily to live healthily.xvi

Children

  • A child dies every 15 seconds from a lack of clean water.xvii
  • Diarrhea remains in the second leading cause of death among children under five globally. Nearly one in five child deaths – about 1.5 million each year – is due to diarrhea. It kills more young children than AIDS, malaria and measles combined.xviii
  • A UNICEF study found that Jamaican students age 9-12 with a water-borne disease were in classes only half as much as their uninfected peers.xix
  • In villages where access to clean water is provided, the infant mortality rate can drop by 50%. xx

Women

  • In just one day, more than 200 million hours of women’s time is consumed for the most basic of human needs — collecting water for domestic use.xxi
  • When walking great distances to retrieve water, women are at greater risk of sexual assault and harassment.xxii
  • In some places, women have to walk nearly 10 kilometers to reach a water source.xxiii

Economics

  • The UN estimates it would cost an additional $30 billion to provide access to safe water to the entire planet. That’s a third of what the world spends in a year on bottled water.xxiv
  • If people had access to clean drinking water, 320 million productive days could be gained each year due to improved health.xxv
  • There could be a time saving of 20 billion working days per year from more convenient water supply and sanitation services.xxvi
  • If people had access to clean drinking water, there could be 272 million school-attendance days gained each year due to improved health.xxvii
  • Every $1 spent on water and sanitation generates a return of $9 in saved time, increased productivity and reduced health costs in Africa.xxviii
  • More than two-thirds of those without clean water survive on less than $2 a day.xxix

Resources

i Why Water:
http://www.charitywater.org/whywater/

ii The Global Water Crisis:
http://www.un.org/works/sub2.asp?lang=en&s=19

iii Freshwater Crisis:
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/freshwater-crisis

iv The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

v The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

vi Water Facts:
http://water.org/learn-about-the-water-crisis/facts/

vii Water Facts:
http://water.org/learn-about-the-water-crisis/facts/

viii Water Facts & Trivia:
http://www.lenntech.com/water-trivia-facts.htm

ix The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

x Freshwater Crisis:
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/freshwater/freshwater-crisis

xi Echenser, Tasha. World Water Day Photos: Water Savvy Cities: 3/22/2011.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110322-world-water-day-top-cities/

xii WHO Facts and figures: Water, sanitation and hygiene links to health:
http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/publications/factsfigures04/en/

xiii The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

xiv The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

xv The World’s Water Crisis: Just the Facts Ma’am:
http://news.change.org/stories/the-worlds-water-crisis-just-the-facts-maam

xvi Water Facts & Trivia:
http://www.lenntech.com/water-trivia-facts.htm

xvii Why Water? Get the story. :
http://thewaterproject.org/why_water.asp?Ref=htgcw

xviii Water Facts:
http://water.org/learn-about-the-water-crisis/facts/

xix Children and Water: Global Statistics. UNICEF, 2011.
http://www.unicef.org/wash/index_31600.html

xx Why? Because Health in Africa Begins with Water:
http://thewaterproject.org/health.asp

xxi Water Facts:
http://water.org/learn-about-the-water-crisis/facts/

xxii Why Water?
http://www.charitywater.org/whywater/

xxiii The Global Water Crisis:
http://www.un.org/works/sub2.asp?lang=en&s=19

xxiv The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

xxv Soap, Toilets and Taps. A foundation for Healthy Children: How UNICEF Supports water, sanitation and hygiene. © United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). February 2009.

xxvi Soap, Toilets and Taps. A foundation for Healthy Children: How UNICEF Supports water, sanitation and hygiene. © United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). February 2009.

xxvii Soap, Toilets and Taps. A foundation for Healthy Children: How UNICEF Supports water, sanitation and hygiene. © United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). February 2009.

xxviii The Facts About The Global Drinking Water Crisis:
http://blueplanetnetwork.org/water/facts

xxix The Global Water Crisis:
http://www.un.org/works/sub2.asp?lang=en&s=19